Menu
Cart 0

How to cook a Frozen Turkey

Posted by Lynn Applegate on

How to cook a Frozen Turkey

 By: Veronica

For years I have cooked my turkey from frozen because it is so easy and tastes amazing! If you don't like a juicy turkey and you love to have to carve it off the bone and all the work that it entails then this isn't the turkey for you, however if you like a juicy turkey that falls off the bone and enough broth to add to anything you wish then read on.

The meat from this turkey will be tender and juicy. The breast pieces will be intact and pretty enough to serve on a platter and pretend to carve. I remove all other meat from the bone, removing all gristle and veins. This makes it easy at serving time.

frozen turkey

Instructions:

• Turn roasting pan to 250°

• Add 1 3/4 gallons of water (that’s 28 cups).

• Put frozen turkey in roaster pan, breast side down.

• Put lid on and wrap with tin foil to keep steam in, because the frozen turkey holds the lid up

• Cook covered for 12 hours (8pm to 8am is what I do).

When you look at it in the morning, remove the gravy packet if there is one, and gently turn the turkey over so it is breast side up. Cover it again and cook for 1 more hour.

Now it’s time to remove the neck and bag of giblets and set aside. The turkey should be slightly browned. Gently separate the thighs from the breasts so you can carefully remove both breasts and place on your tray. Next, the leg pieces, then the back and wings.

turkey bones

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notice that the meat has pulled away from the bone and it could fall apart.

turkey drippings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now at this point I make sure to remove all of the little bones from the drippings with a slotted spoon or strainer. You should have about 20 cups of awesome drippings to use for your stuffing and gravy, with some left over to freeze for another time

The reason I cook my turkey this way is to eliminate the possibility of excitotoxins. I make everything from scratch, no need for bouillon for flavoring, dressing or gravy. Sometimes I put spices in the water I cook the turkey in, like green or red chile, salt, onion granules, and garlic granules or fresh onion and minced garlic. Not everyone will appreciate the gravy like that though, so I generally keep it simple to feed the crowd.

Tip: I use my drippings from the turkey for making posole.


Share this post



← Older Post Newer Post →


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published.